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17 min read
May 23, 2022

They’ll never get past your blog intro if it sucks.

If you’re not a professional writer, the thought of writing an engaging and attention-grabbing blog post introduction can be daunting. 

You might ask yourself:

  • How can I make sure my blog intro stands out and hooks my reader?
  • What should I give them in my opening sentence? 
  • What do I write to make them want to keep reading?

All these questions are valid, and it can be tough to know where to start.

Fear not!

With little practice and some helpful tips, you can write a blog intro that will leave your readers wanting more.

By the end of this post, I’ll also give you an unbreakable framework to write a blog post intro that will hook your readers’ attention and make them want more.

But first, let’s take a look at:

4 elements of a great blog intro

The 4 elements that make a great blog intro include:

1. The hook

This is, most of the time, the very first sentence/paragraph of your blog post.

The hook is used at the beginning of your blog post to pique the reader’s interest.

This section is your last chance to catch your reader’s attention and make them want more.

It should be short, straight to the point, and catchy.

A few types of statements that can serve as a hook for your topic can be:

  • A statistic
  • Inquisitive question
  • Bold claim
  • Anecdote
  • Quote
  • Provocative opinion.

2. Context

Just after the hook is the perfect time to introduce your topic and contextualize it for the reader.

This will help them understand why the information you’re providing is important and how it applies/benefits their lives.

In simple words, this is where you give your reader some context for “WHY” they should be paying attention to what you have to say.

The stronger your “WHY” is, the more likely they are to keep reading.

There is a famous copywriting formula that strongly emphasizes your “WHY” in your copy named:

Problem-Agitate-Solution (PAS) Formula

It’s the most commonly used copywriting formula for a reason: it works.

The PAS formula is simple (and you can even access copy templates for it), but it’s extremely effective at getting your readers’ attention and explaining your “WHY”.

Let’s see how to use the PAS formula.

Phase 1: State The PROBLEM

The first phase of this framework is to state the problem.

You need to emphasize what the hardcore problem is that your readers are facing.

This takes a lot of research, and you must be sure of what the problems are that your target market is struggling with.

State the problem in a clear way that is easy to understand.

This will get your readers’ attention and make them want to know more about what you have to say.

The points in your argument should be logical and factual, and once you have shown that there is a problem, you need to move on to the next step, which is emotional agitation.

Phase 2: AGITATE The Problem

Now, let’s make things worse.

You have found a point of pain that’s already bleeding your reader’s time or money.

All you’ve got to do is to make it more emotional by using strong language to show how bad things are.

This is where you add salt to the wound you just scraped.

Talk about all the bad things that happen because of this problem and how life isn’t fair and also how it will be better if this problem goes away.

Don’t make the audience feel too bad. Adding excessive negativity might hurt your brand’s reputation.

Structure your material in such a manner that, by progressing to the end of your copy, they’re able to see the light at the end of the tunnel (hope for them).

Phase 3: Offer A SOLUTION

Finally, it’s time to make things better.

After all, you’ve built up the problem and potential consequences enough that they’re ready to hear your answer.

This is the moment to reveal the “SOLUTION,” your audience’s only hope for relief.

It’s your time to become their SUPERMAN.

Your solution must be realistic and achievable, addressing the specific needs of your audience.

It also has to be something they haven’t heard before, or at least not from you.

If you offer a generic solution that everyone’s heard of before, you’ll come across as unoriginal and lose touch.

The goal is to present yourself as the expert who can solve this problem once and for all.

So, make sure your solution is comprehensive, credible, and convincing.

3. Support Pillars

You’ve now given your reader the whole context of the problem you’re talking about.

They now know their “WHY,” and this is where 80% of your job is done.

You just have to support your argument made above and slowly persuade them to take action.

In this phase, you can mention what else they’ll be getting out of this blog post (apart from the main solution).

It can be a free e-book, guide, membership access, cheat sheets, case studies, checklist, templates, etc.

You can also lighten things up for your readers by cracking a topic-related joke to make it fun for them.

This will not only enhance your credibility but will also make you seem more trustworthy and genuine.

4. Call-To-Action

Congratulations! 97% of the blog intro has already been written.

This is the final section, and to be honest, it’s also the weakest. 

However, I recommend you include one because not doing so may render your blog post difficult to navigate or the reader might lose the connecting link to the next part of your blog. 

We’re not writing CTAs for a sales page; rather, it’s for a blog.

We’ll utilize non-salesy CTAs, with the primary goal of enticing visitors to read the rest of our blog article.

Now that you know the 4 essential elements of a great blog intro, it’s time to put them into practice with the . . .

Unbreakable framework to write a catchy blog intro

To help you write an irresistible blog intro, let’s take an example topic: X Ways To Make Money Blogging

Step 1: Hook Statment

Let’s start off by writing a hook statement for this topic. As you know a hook statement can be anything from the below list:

  • Statistic
  • Inquisitive question
  • Bold claim
  • Anecdote
  • Quote
  • A conflicting statement.

For the sake of this example, I’ll use bold-claim as a hook.

With this hook type, you’ll need to make strong assertions about your subject.

Claims can typically revolve around one of the below 3 things:

  • How fast you’ve achieved such tremendous results?
  • How much money you’ve made/saved?
  • How much effort/time was saved in doing that task?

Now, combining at least 2 above elements, the best hook statement for the topic X Ways To Make Money Blogging can be:

Hook Statement: These X monetization strategies made me a whopping $1M from blogging in just the last 6 months.

You can see how the above hook naturally tells you about:

  • Getting fast results
  • How much money was made in such a short time

A bold claim should live up to itself and should contain at least 2 of the above elements to make it more appealing.

Note: Refrain from making claims that you can’t or won’t fulfill or that appear to be based on a clickbait headline. These techniques might help you obtain fewer bounce rates, but in the long run, you’ll lose your audience’s confidence.

Now that we have got our hook statement, it’s time to contextualize the idea for the audience.

Step 2: PAS formula

As mentioned, we’ll use the above PAS formula to emphasize the WHY of this topic.

Our goal should be to hit hard on this part so that readers can get a clear idea of:

  • Why it’s critical for them and
  • Why they should pay attention to it

We’ll start with figuring out the most pressing issue the reader has regarding the topic you’re writing about.

We’ll list all the problems and start by:

Giving them a glimpse of the problem:

“Making money blogging can seem like a daunting task. You hear about people making six figures a year, and it feels impossible.

Let me tell you.

It’s not impossible, but it does take a lot of hard work.”

Now, it’s time to agitate on the problem:

“There are several challenges involved in earning a living as a blogger, including:

  • The difficulty of standing out in a sea of millions of other blogs,
  • The time and effort required to build up a following,
  • The need to continuously create new content, etc.

There are other numerous moving elements in blogging, from identifying sponsors to establishing affiliate connections, collecting payments, and so on.”

Agitate and scratch that wound a little more: If all this wasn’t enough, you also have to focus on SEO, link building, outreach marketing, etc.

It’s easy to feel like giving up on many of these jobs because they are time-consuming and energy-draining.

Now, give them some hope and provide a solution:

“But fear not. There are a number of things you can do to make good money blogging.

  • Not giving up is the first step
  • The second is using the right tools and monetization strategies

That’s where this list comes in.”

Here, you can see we have perfectly contextualized the problem for our readers.

Next, it’s time to provide:

Step 3: Support Pillars

Congrats, you’ve done 80% of the job successfully.

All we have to do now is provide more value through additional content to make their lives simpler.

A few things that can act as support pillars are mentioned above.

But for the sake of this example, we’ll take the blog monetization checklist.

You don’t have to put too much pressure on yourself writing this part, a sentence or two is more than enough. 

Here’s what it should look like:

“Also, at the end of this blog post, I’ll also share a blog monetization checklist that’ll help identify all the monetization opportunities you were missing for your blogging business”.

Keep in mind that this is just an example, and you can be as creative as you want with your support pillars.

Finally, it’s time to write our:

Step 4: CTA

As told earlier, the purpose of CTA in the blog intro is to enable the reader to navigate to your next section.

The main idea behind this is to:

  • Link the two sections,
  • Maintain continuity, or
  • Offer them to download your support pillar content

. . . so that the reader navigates to the next section smoothly, just like an SUV crossing a speed breaker without feeling a jerk underneath.

  • Here’s how I’ll write a CTA for the blog intro (without offering a support pillar):

“But before we explore all the money-making opportunities from your blog, let’s figure out: How much money can you make money blogging?”

  • Here’s how I’ll write a CTA for the blog intro (offering a support pillar):

“So, don’t forget to read till the end and grab your blog monetization checklist.  But first, let’s figure out: How much money can you make money blogging?”

Compiling the above 4 elements together, here is the intro we get:

These X monetization strategies made me a whopping $1M from blogging in just the last 6 months.

Making money blogging can seem like a daunting task. You hear about people making six figures a year, and it feels impossible.

Let me tell you.

It’s not impossible, but it does take a lot of hard work.

There are several challenges involved in earning a living as a blogger, including:

  • The difficulty of standing out in a sea of millions of other blogs,
  • The time and effort required to build up a following,
  • The need to continuously create new content, etc.

There are numerous other moving elements in blogging, from identifying sponsors to establishing affiliate connections, collecting payments, and so on.

If all this wasn’t enough, you also have to focus on the impact of SEO, link building, outreach, etc. It’s easy to feel like giving up on many of these jobs because they are time-consuming and energy-draining.

But fear not. There are a number of things you can do to make good money blogging.

  • Not giving up is the first step
  • The second is using the right tools and monetization strategies

That’s where this list comes in.

Also, at the end of this blog post, I’ll also share a blog monetization checklist that’ll help identify all the monetization opportunities you were missing for your blogging business.

So, read till the end, and don’t forget to grab your blog monetization checklist. But first, let’s figure out:

How much money can you make money blogging?”

This is how you write an awesome blog intro.

But what about:

A few more tips to write even a much better blog intro

There’s no denying that a great blog intro can make or break your post.

So, how can you make sure your intro is up to snuff?

Here are a few additional tips to make it even better:

Write the blog intro last

One of the best pieces of advice I ever received about writing blog posts was to write the introduction last.

It sounds counterintuitive, but it actually makes a lot of sense.

When you start with the introduction, you often get bogged down in trying to make a great first impression.

As a result, the rest of the post can suffer.

By writing the body of the post first, you can focus on getting your thoughts down without worrying about how they’ll be received.

Then, once you’ve got all your ideas on paper, you can go back and craft an Introduction that provides context and sets the stage for what’s to come.

Trust me, it’s a much better way to write a blog intro!

Use AI Writers

Writer’s block’s a real thing.

Sometimes, it’s hard to come up with fresh ideas, or you might be short on time and just need a little help getting started.

That’s where AI writing tools can be a huge help.

There are a number of different AI writing tools available that use natural language processing (NLP), and they can all speed up the writing process and help you combat writer’s block.

But it’s important to use them as assistants, not blindly trust their outputs.

After all, you’re the writer, and your voice should always come through in your final piece.

Also, we don’t need these robots taking away the jobs of writers like me and you anytime soon.

Keep it short and sweet

You don’t want to overwhelm your reader with too much information and risk confusing them.

Instead, focus on giving a brief overview of what your post will be about.

This will help to pique their interest and set the stage for the rest of your article.

Additionally, make sure to avoid any pointless fluff or filler.

Get straight to the point and let your readers know what they can expect from your post. 

Focus on the search intent

If you’re looking to improve your blog intro, one of the best ways to do so is by focusing on the search intent of your readers.

In other words, think about what people are searching for when they come across your post.

Are they looking for information, entertainment, inspiration, or something else?

Knowing the search intent of your readers can help you to better target your content and ensure that you’re providing the kind of information that they’re looking for.

Few CMS software like WordpPress and some landing page builders (for example Unbounce and Leadpages) often have built-in or additional SEO plugins that you can use to optimize a blog for SEO and search intent.

Additionally, it’s important to keep in mind that different keywords denote different levels of search intent.

For example, keywords that include terms like “best,” “vs,” “review,” or “alternatives” likely denote commercial intent, which means that people are looking to buy something.

On the other hand, keywords that include terms like “what is” or “how to” likely denote informational intent, which means that people are simply looking for information about a topic.

Knowing the difference between these two types of keywords can help you to better understand the needs of your readers and ensure that you’re providing the right type of content.

Make the title appealing

Regardless of what you’re writing about, one of the most important things you can do is to make your blog title interesting.

After all, the title is what will draw people in from Google SERPs to your post.

A good title should be descriptive, attention-grabbing, and relevant to the content of your article.

It should also be short and to the point—anything longer than a few words is likely to lose readers’ attention.

Also, make sure to check your title if it’s not getting stripped off in Google SERPs. 

Nothing can be worse than a persuasive and catchy title, yet not fully visible to your audience.

You can do this using the Yoast plugin for WP or even manually in Google sheets. Mind, that the number of title characters Google displays in full is constantly changing. Currently, Google tends to display the first 50-60 characters. 

Paint a picture in their minds

A great blog intro should be able to give your reader a clear picture of what the blog post is going to be about.

It should be interesting enough to make them want to read on, but not so detailed that they feel like they already know everything there is to know about the topic.

A good way to achieve this is to use sensory language.

Describe what you see, smell, feel, etc.

This will help your reader form a more vivid mental image and make them more likely to stick around until the end of the post.

Additionally, try to avoid using cliche phrases or overrun examples.

Be creative—your readers will appreciate it!

Conclusion

A blog post intro is the next big thing your reader sees after your blog title. 

It’s what determines whether they will stick around and read more of your content or not, so you need to make it good!

Make sure that everything in this section counts: every word should be engaging and captivating—they must hook the reader’s attention early on before they get bored.

The 4 elements we’ve discussed are all important parts of a great opening for any blog post.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this post.

Before we part our ways, I’d request you to scroll to the top, read the blog intro of this post, and let me know what type of hook I used to keep you reading till the end and rate my blog intro on a scale of 1-10 in the comments below.

Happy blogging!

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comments5
  1. I guess what you really need is a writing talent. But your framework is great, as well as the tips. Thanks for sharing.

    1. Any tips or suggestions are welcome. Hope you benefitted from the framework

  2. Love your writing style 😍

    1. Thanks a lot Jeniffer

  3. I like your blog because your content writing is so amazing, your content helps me with marketing skills. that’s why I write an dissertation online help of your content.

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